Slow Sewing 

This is a skirt or  maybe a petticoat in the making. I bought the silk fabric maybe fifteen years ago but never used it because the colour doesn’t suit me. 

This is the book that inspired me to do something with it. I’m sewing it into a four panel drawstring skirt with the intention of dyeing it with tea when it’s done. 

I’m using variegated silk thread and making French seams. 

I think I need to slow down my sewing and take more pleasure in it, so I’m sewing by hand.

I’m collecting tea bags in the freezer. I reckon I’ll have enough in a fortnight and the skirt / petticoat should be finished by then.

Drop by in a fortnight if you’re interested in the process. 

Have a happy week.

Norma x 

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22 Comments

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22 responses to “Slow Sewing 

  1. I can’t wait to see this one finished. I love tea dyeing and French seams!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I admire your dedication – I think this sounds like it is going to be a super make. I’ve not seen variegated silk thread before – who makes that?

    Like

  3. Ooh, this looks interesting! I can’t wait to see it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Deb

    Mighty glad you waited15 years to do something with the silk.. cause now I get to see what you are going to do with it.😄

    Liked by 1 person

  5. What are French seems? Can’t wait to see it. How long will the dyeing process take?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Interesting! I’ll have to come back to see it finished!

    Like

  7. I can’t wait to see how the colour comes out! I love the try and see what happens projects. xx

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Silk is a real challenge. I hope it turns out well. What will you use as a fixative? I once used tea to dye some lace I had leftover but the mellow color eventually washed away. The lace looked a light creamy white. I didn’t know anything about fixatives.

    Liked by 1 person

    • All these colours will eventually wash out. I plan to redye when that happens.
      It’s very easy to sew by hand but I noticed the silk thread doesn’t lie flat until it’s pressed. The fabric and thread take a very hot iron – something i learned from the India Flint book.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Looking forward to seeing how it turns out!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Pingback: More about Dyeing | She Sews You Know

  11. Pingback: Enjoying the Slowness | She Sews You Know

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